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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
blowers. >> reporter: the allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policies with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelation from snowdon and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. >> reporter: but congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is that the nsa has saved thousands of lives not just in the usa but france, germany, and throughout europe. >> reporter: former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> our over all surveillance abilities are important and need to be preserved. >> reporter: and it remains to be seen if that careful diplomacy will go over so smoothly with lawmakers on their three-day visit to washington this week. >> al jazeera, we're live in washington, and the white house has yet to respond to the latest report of spying to world leaders? >> reporter: not officially. we have a briefing coming up in just over an hour
. >> essentially it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east - one, the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel. it cannot end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain the peace treaty. that is where you see some of the material, some of the military parts that are being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula. there's the matter of enhancing the u.s.'s stature across the great e-middle east. it would -- greater middle east. it would not do for the barack obama situation to cut off all ties with a country with whom it has had a longstanding political relationship. one of points that john kerry is making whilst in cairo is that the interim government, backed by the military, can't exist inperpetuaty, it needs to get on with establishing elections for a democratic-elected parliament and needs to take the steps sooner rather than later. >> let's talk about the visit to cairo. we didn't know about it until he landed, which makes you think iraq, afghanistan - dangerous places. what are t
.s. can reconcile the democracy in egypt. >> it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east. >> one the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel and it can simply not end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain that peace treaty. that is where you see the material or the military parts that are still being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula, for example. there is also the matter of trying to enhance the u.s.' stature across the middle east. it would not due for the obama administration to cut off all ties with the country with who it's had a long standing political and military relationship because of these political problems. >> with that said one. points secon secretary kerry isg while he is in cairo, this interm government cannot exist in perpetuity. it needs to get on with the business of constitutional reforms and establishing elections for a new democratically elected president and parliament. and it need to take on has to steps much soonerrather than later. >> let's tal
on the public? finally, what are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no random -- no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference
friendship ith other countries. if you follow iraq's foreign policy, you would see that the iraqis think independently and not according to the interest of any others. we have a partnership an agreement with the united states. this is something some other countries do not like. that we like it, this is what matters. be believed to have a strong relation within the united states. if others do not agree, it is their problem. they cannot impose anything on the iraqis. if they want to be our friends our friendship does not impose on us being enemies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is not coming from me, but a question from someone else -- say you are consolidating power and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution and ruling in iraq gives prerogative. this is something i state clearly. let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not acceptable to some of our partners, as long as i am committing to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogative in a constitutional way, there should ot be a
. let's close with free trade. you're on the board of an organization called just foreign policy, and that organization is offering a reward to anyone who can give it a copy of the negotiating text of the trans-pacific partnership agreement. any takers so far? >> not so far. so the idea here is that we do have people involved in negotiating process, they have access to at least parts of the deal. so the hope is that someone from good conscience, presumably more than, you know, the hope of getting a big reward, will feel, you know, feel the urge to make it public and, you know, the organization just foreign policy -- i'm on the board, but i don't play an active role in running it -- will be happy to then post on the web so that, you know, people across the country can really, you know, in all the countries will have an opportunity to see it. >> so in the last word here, both of you, the argument is this trans-pacific partnership agreement will ensure a freer flow of goods and greater prosperity. the other side of it really serves essentially what we know about it, the corporate in
. lou: always good to talk with you. come back soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. lou: an explosiv
. lou: always good to talk with you. come bac soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ lou: an explosive new book entitled double down focusing on potential 2016 candidates and according to authors, mitt romney's decided he could not choose new dirt -- new jersey's governor as running mate because his background was littered with land mines. allegedly had unanswered questions concerning a defamation lawsuit, his medical history, and this time as a securities industry lobbyist. another major revelation in the book, the president's top aides secretly considering replacing vice president biden on the 2012 ticket with then secretary of state hillary clinton. the last time the federal government delivered a new health care benefit to more than 40 billion people, our next guest was in charge, health and human services secretary when the bush administration unveiled medicare
, he has been a leader and virtually every foreign- policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year, he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. two weeks ago, i was honored to travel to asia with secretary kerry where you push key initiatives like the trans- pacific partnership. he has knowledge and global reach in this leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, a man who he would dedicate his life to serve the united states in a tireless and can do way and is dealing with the tough issues that face our world. please help me welcome my friend secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. thank you very much. thank you for an extraordinary introduction. based on the introduction, i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. i tell you, a couple of months before i was out of the job of being secretary stay, i'm still serving and the u.s. senate. i was walking through the airport one day and you notice when
is the embargo still in place? >> well, it's hard to think about more counter productive foreign policy than the u.s. embargo. here we have 180 plus nations in the united nations voting against a country who's supposedly the beacon of liberty around the world in favor of a ruthless brutal dictatorship because of the the embargo. i cannot think of a policy that has served the opposite purpose of the goal towards cuba. i mean, after 50 years of the embargo in place, cuba is not any closer to becoming a democracy than in 1960, so i think it's pretty clear that it is an utter failure. >> this is the 22nd year in a row the u.n. voted on this issue. last year, three voted in favor of the sufficient, this year only two, israel being the second. is the u.s. growing more and more isolated on this issue and what does it signal? >> the tiny island of paolo was the other country that voted last year in favor of the united states. i think the embargo is quite the useful tool for the cuban regime. look at what's going on. it helps the cuban regime to rally the entire world behind them and against the unit
. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us cover. i'm going it start with the first question on the threat we face and why we need -- feel we need security. if there are no benefits with e wouldn't have be having the discussion. with that, george, i would like to turn to you. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our security and -- it's changed, henry, i think a few relatively significant ways. first, it is a threat than it was ten to fifteen years ago. it's not necessarily aligned bay group by ideology and other driving factors which may be complaint about how we are conducting ourselves in their view. secondly, the threat seems to progress at time very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today perhaps in some obscure part of the world could in fact be on the doorstep tomorrow. lastly, it has significantly. they don't necessarily appear based on their actions and recent actions are indicators of that. that necess
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
of the faith. i came to realise that islamism was a grievance. up until that point i was aggrieved by foreign policy. islamism was the largest obstacle preventing muslim societies from progressing. i was someone driven by a sense of injustice. i wanted to seek for justice. that would entail challenging the islamist ideology. if i realised that it was an obstacle to the advancement of muslim society. we grounded quinn lamb. >> we have a question from a huer. >>> jd rosen asks is reduction of drone war fair an effective countermeasure against new extremist recruitment? >> so i've been critical of uab, drone strikes. if the policy is carrick cattured as democracy at the barrel of the gun, was bush's stance. if the leadership of al qaeda was dealt with by drone strikes, president obama felt he could deal with the problem. it's an ideology, an inurgency, not just an organization. president obama's organization said al qaeda inspired terrorist. it's the end product. >> you write in reference to al qaeda - you can't kill an idea. ideas are bulletproof. what is it that the united states can do. what
he has seen the european policy advisor and foreign policy advisor cath rich ashton over the last few months and with african allegation to see he was properly cared for and the message by his family is he was properly carried for and well treated, but the authorities, whether they would allow the legal team access or whether it was the legal team wasn't given access because he didn't want to talk to lawyers. if he is saying i'm the president and if he is still saying i have nothing to defend, then what is he going to talk about? they would have been looking at what happened in early december last year, what the charges relate to, outside the presidential court there and we have a huge antisitting and that was cleared and the charges were more than that and there were more that were killed that night but not bringing those up in court because the other people that died were muslim brotherhood. they are only referring to those who were not and the charges relate to insightment to commit murder. so we understand and we don't know this because we have not been told but the prosecution's
in those shadows, but his insights have helped shape the key foreign policy decisions of the last three presidents. the first thing we asked morell about was the last thing he did at the c.i.a.: taking part in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell:
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
of conduct of foreign policy since u.s. revolutionary war times, since the beginning of history you have had pies. what is different is technology, the capability to listen in to everything. and i think that that is what the administration is dealing with is technology so different we'll have to think about new rules of the road. >> i was going to say in this question of running amuck being on auto pilot you used that borrowed, that ask what sect of state kerry said. you add this technological capability if it's running on auto pilot and people who are overseeing don't know what it's doing, then it has this control and overseers don't know what it's doing and one of the amazing things what nsa was doing with google and yahoo! scraping all of their data out of the area that ability does make it seem like the nsa has found new mothers for itself that the people who were supposed to other sees, supposed to keep this kelp del cat wall between safety and civil liberties they don't know what is going on. >> the mystery here is the between what john said they can do and what they actually are doin
the region. but foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. if we can find ways to resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise to explore them. engagement is not appeasement, nor is it containment. we know what those are, we know where they lead, and we will not pursue them. and president obama has repeatedly made clear that words are not enough. action must match words. we understand why this is so important to so many people. because we've all been to yad vashem. earlier this year, i had the opportunity to revisit yad vashem. i had been there before, but this time was special for, because i brought my son, ziller, with me. i wanted him to see the harsh realities of the depths of evil, and the beautiful tribute to the victims of the past. yad vashem is an instruction for future generations -- like all great memorials. a warning to never ever again stand idly by in the face of hatred and bigotry. we know that ridding our world of hatred takes more than just work, imagination, and so on. it will always demand commitment, sacrifice, and courage. it demands that we must continue to march our armies of t
in asia. asia is the focal point of this administration's foreign policy. the pivot we have discussed frequently. withrip will be in keeping intense focus the president has brought to bear on our relationships in the region and on our presence in the region. this will be a continuation of the work the president has done. that the president looks forward to speaking with the vice president about the trip before he goes and getting a readout on his return. according to a news report, nsa has several [indiscernible] beijing and hong kong. will this be an issue between the vice president and his counterparts in china? comment on specific reported intelligence gathering activities. what i am confident of is when the vice president travels and has meetings with counterparts in foreign countries that every topic is on the table. he said get back to us on the answer to that, is the president rolling out fundraising for any and credit super pac for the coming cycle? >> i have not had a single conversation about 2014. you and get back to you to the extent we have answers on these questions. but
goals, foreign relationships, and her policy toward pyongyang. her departure for europe, she told the bbc that it is hard to trust the north korean leader, because he did not honor his promises, but that any provocation by pyongyang would carry a huge price tag, and her country would never accept a nuclear-armed north korea. >> we cannot repeat the vicious cycle of the past, where north korea's nuclear threats and provocations were met with and then followed by renewed provocations and threats. otherwise, north korea will continue to further advance its nuclear capability, and will come to a point where this situation will be even harder to crack. we will not be talking about whether north korea should or should not possess nuclear weapons. but their demands will creep to such an extent that they will be calling for arms reduction or arms talks. and it will be more difficult to deal with this issue. >> after decades of failed negotiations and nuclear tests, pyongyang is getting closer to a deliverable nuclear weapon. it's long-range rocket launch last year, and its most recent nuc
, the difference is the president was awful lucky we had an affordable care act all week because of the foreign policy and here israel dropping bombs in syria on missiles that were sort of underreported was to me a pretty big deal. i mean, we have that problem that's still there. we have the middle east and an i iranian problem and did drop off the screen. i thought that was very important. >> what about obama care? you were telling us earlier repeal and replace with what, right? >> it is not just repeal and replace and go back to vermont. i don't agree with anything but they're doing something different and republicans have to get into exactly what they think it's resetting obama care, redoing it. that's still for another day. >> thank you so much. christine, kayton, david, all thank you so much. thank you for watching. i'm richard lui. i'll see you tomorrow right back here at 3:00 p.m. eastern time but first "disrupt with karen finney." [ male announcer ] this is claira. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for her, she's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states. therefore i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency declared with respect to sudan and maintain and enforce the sanctions against sudan to respond to this threat. signed, barack obama, the white house, october 30, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: the message will be referred to the committee on foreign affairs and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. gohmert: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 10:00 a.m. on friday, november 1, 2013, unless it has received a message from the senate transmitting its concurrence in the house concurrent resolution 62, in which case the house shall stand adjourned pursuant to that concurrent resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. gohmert: pursuant to the order of the house today, mr. speaker, i move that the house do now hereby adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjo
to target foreign leaders' intentions to try to determine what the best policy might be for the united states of america? thing ithe first learned in intelligence school in 1963. leadership intentions, no matter what led -- level you are talking about. believe the allies have conducted any kind of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with a story from the former french head of the dcri? >> that is the french domestic intelligence organization. >> let me read you a quote. i am amazed by such disconcerting naÏvetÉ. you'd almost inc. our politicians don't bother to read the ports they get from their ourlligence -- think politicians don't bother to read the reports they get from their intelligence department. say, some of this reminds me of the classic movie casablanca. my god, there is gambling going on here. it is the same kind of thing. alexander, in your experience as director of the security agency, have allies in the united states engaged in anything that you call and espionage act toward the unit
foreign leaders' intentions to dry to determine the best policy for the united states of america? >> it's one of the first things i learned in intelligence school in 1983 that this is the fundmental given in the intelligence business is leadership intentions, no matter what level you're talking about. that can be military leaders as well. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service, our leaders, or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with a story recently from the former french head of the direct -- well, the dcri -- are you familiar with that? >> that's the french domestic intelligence organization. >> let me read you a quote from that gentleman. quote, i'm amazed by such disconcerning naivety, he said in the interview. you'd think the politicians don't read reports they get from the intelligence services. he's talking about french spying on our allies including the united states of america. do you find that consistent with what you know as director of the nationa
intelligence or suspected foreign agents. >> one major point was made to surveillance policies, saying everybody else is doing it too. they claim some of the information came from nato allies, not u.s. spying. greece has admitted to spying on the u.s. and others in the 1990's at the hearing. james clapper made it clear the u.s. is in good company. >> you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> he said the white house was aware the n.s.a. oversees eavesdropping all along, but may not have known specifics. >> russian leaders denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last months g-20 summit. the report by two italian newspapers say delegates were given memory sticks and phone chargers equipped with spyware. it's unclear how many leaders received the bags or used the free bees. >> edward snowden can earn a ticket out of russia if he testifies about spying. germany are investigating report
afternoon. i am going to start the first afternoon session. the topic is foreign intelligence surveillance. we are pleased to have as theesses, james baker with department of justice, office of intelligence, and policy review. judge james carr, a senior federal judge of the united states district court and formerly a judge from 2002 2008. sillinger, a former doj attorney at the computer crime and electrical property section. these make your remarks and then afterwards we will have five minutes for each of the board members. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank the board for inviting me back. it is an honor to be here and an honor to be able to discuss these kinds of issues in this type of setting. i appreciate the opportunity. i have just a couple of quick comments. is focus of our discussion on 702 of the fisa amendment act patriot act.e while these are very important statutorily authorized and judicial he reviewed surveillance programs involving the collections and communications -- collection of commit occasions and to medications data with many americans, they are only part of
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)